Black Magic and Sea Snakes – part two

The second of a three-part excerpt (read part one here) from To the Brink, published early 2015, in which the Expedition 360 team encounter sea snakes and black magic on a remote island off the north coast of Flores, Indonesia:

A third snake suddenly appeared. I grabbed the video camera and began filming. “What is going on?” I said. Snakes gave me the same heebie-jeebies as spiders. “Why all these snakes?”

Sea snakes and black magic were encountered on an Indonesian island by adventurers Jason Lewis and April Abril

It didn’t make sense. At the first sight of a human, virtually every wild animal I’d ever come across had turned tail and scarpered, millennia of extermination rendering them wary of engaging Homo sapiens. So why were these snakes taking such an interest in us?

Continue reading

Black Magic and Sea Snakes – part one

In August of 2005, April and I found ourselves camping on an idyllic islet off the north coast of Flores, Indonesia, during a 7-month kayaking expedition from East Timor to Singapore. An experience that first night on the island left us badly shaken, and our skepticism of black magic and blind acceptance of Western scientific thought both in doubt. This is the first of a three-part excerpt from my upcoming book, To the Brink (published April 1, 2015).

April of Expedition 360 lights a fire on an islet north of Flores, Indonesia, which turned out to be infested with sea snakes

Continue reading

Should expeditions have a purpose other than shameless self-promotion?

It’s a variation of the big “Why” question adventurers are always asked in media interviews. Why ride a bicycle to Timbuktu? Why be the two thousandth person to summit Mount Everest? Why row a bathtub to the North Pole?

Adventurer Jason Lewis questions the purpose of expeditions in the twenty-first century

Continue reading

Biking India – The Tao of Poo and the Eightfold Path of Buddhism

In this extract from my forthcoming book, To the Brink, I am privy to a whole new perspective on the meaning of suffering while biking India

“Malamūtra, excrement, is so intrinsic to life in rural India that for some it constitutes their sole reason to be. I saw a thirteen-year-old boy who should have been at school squatting under a cow’s backside instead, his job being to wait until the thing shat. When finally it did, he caught the deluge in a rudimentary baseball mitt fashioned from an old grocery bag. Like an expert pastry chef he then mixed in some straw and spanked the steaming matter into four dung-patties before laying them out in the sun to dry for fuel.

Photo of Indian nomads on the move, taken by  adventurer Jason Lewis while biking in India

Continue reading

Which Takes True Grit: Long-Haul Expeditions or a 9 to 5?

In keeping with my last post about the aftermath of long-haul journeys, here’s a snippet from my upcoming book, To the Brink, about expeditions and whether they’re just an elaborate excuse to avoid responsibilities back home.

True Grit: Travel versus a Sedentary Lifestyle?

The uniformed ticket inspector handed me back my stub. “This is not a valid ticket,” he announced.

“But I bought it only fifteen minutes ago.”

I was on the 17.10 from Paddington to Reading, sharing a packed commuter carriage with several hundred weary London commuters returning home. Three days previously, I’d arrived back at Greenwich after 13 years of circumnavigating the planet by human power. This was the fastest I’d gone in a long time.

The inspector looked at me like I was an imbecile. “It is a receipt, not a ticket.”

Continue reading

Stem Cell Treatment & High Mileage Expeditions

“What is it like transitioning from a multi-year expedition back to regular life?”

This has been a frequent question since completion of my thirteen-year circumnavigation, and I usually talk about the psychological implications of coming home: of reintegrating back into society, of refocusing from the primary motivation of making miles west, and reacquainting myself with family and old friends.

Pedal boat Moksha powered by adventurer Jason Lewis heading out in the Atlantic wilderness on the Expedition 360 human-powered circumnavigation

Continue reading

Adventure books: The Seed Buried Deep published

If you haven’t already got your hands on a copy, the second part of The Expedition adventure book series is now available in print and ebook formats in the UK and rest of the world.

Adventure books: The Seed Buried Deep by Jason Lewis

Book cover for The Seed Buried Deep by Jason Lewis

Those left hanging at the end of Dark Waters will find out what happens when you’re run down on an isolated stretch of American highway by the Worshipful Master of the local Masonic Lodge. Does he stop and call for an ambulance? Does he keep driving, later claiming that he thought he’d hit a deer (even though your rucksack has gone through the windshield and is sitting in his wife’s lap), leaving a working-class Hispanic guy to step up to the plate? As The Seed Buried Deep reveals, truth can be stranger than fiction.

Continue reading

BillyFish Books wins Benjamin Franklin Award

June 8, 2013. BillyFish Books wins best first book (nonfiction) for The Expedition, Dark Waters: True Story of the First Human-Powered Circumnavigation of the Earth, presented by Howard Fisher at the Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA) gala in New York last week.

benjamin_franklin_award_600px Continue reading

Dark Waters wins Eric Hoffer Award for Books

Unknown

May 6, 2013. BillyFish Books editor Tammie Stevens and I are delighted to announce that Dark Waters, first in The Expedition trilogy chronicling the first human-powered circumnavigation of the Earth, has won the First Horizon Award for the current Eric Hoffer Award season.

Continue reading

The Expedition book 1, Dark Waters, published in the UK and Rest of the World

After some distribution hiccups, I’m thrilled to announce UK and worldwide publication of Dark Waters, first in The Expedition trilogy chronicling the first human-powered circumnavigation of the Earth.

dark_waters_cover_2.5x3.5

UK best price £7:32 with Amazon.co.uk, Blackwell’s or Waterstones. Australia: Bookworld, Angus and Roberston.

Ebook version available for Kindle, Nook, iTunes, Google Play, Kobo. Get signed copies direct from the publisher.

DESCRIPTION: He survived a terrifying crocodile attack off Australia’s Queensland coast, blood poisoning in the middle of the Pacific, malaria in Indonesia and China, and acute mountain sickness in the Himalayas. He was hit by a car and left for dead with two broken legs in Colorado, and incarcerated for espionage on the Sudan-Egypt border.

The first in a thrilling adventure trilogy, Dark Waters charts one of the longest, most gruelling, yet uplifting and at times irreverently funny journeys in history, circling the world using just the power of the human body, hailed by the London Sunday Times as “The last great first for circumnavigation.”

But it was more than just a physical challenge. Prompted by what scientists have dubbed the “perfect storm” as the global population soars to 8.3 billion by 2030, adventurer Jason Lewis used the expedition to reach out to thousands of schoolchildren, calling attention to our interconnectedness and shared responsibility of an inhabitable Earth for future generations.

The second book in the series, The Seed Buried Deep, will be available soon. Apologies for the delay in publication.

Special thanks for bringing this story to the written page go to Kenny Brown (photos), Tammie Stevens (editor), Rob Antonishen (maps), and Anthony DiMatteo (editing).